Choosing what happens to your body after death is an incredibly personal decision. Whether you choose traditional burial in a cemetery or cremation, you’ve likely reached that decision on factors such as personal preference, religious belief, or cost. There’s ultimately no right or wrong answer and what matters is that you declare those wishes in your will.

If you choose the cremation route, there are a few more things you should consider. Many people who choose cremation choose a trusted person, typically the executor or administrator of their will, to care for their remains.

You have several options for what happens to your cremated remains. Here are a few ideas:

  • Have your ashes scattered. Many people have a favorite or significant place they’ve been. In Florida, you’re legally allowed to scatter ashes on private property or more than three miles offshore in the Gulf of Mexico.

        If you choose to have your ashes scattered in another state, you’ll want to double check            the laws for that specific state for scattering cremated remains.

  • Keep them at home. Some people choose to have their ashes displayed on a mantle or somewhere else in the home of a loved one. It’s a good idea to discuss this with the recipient of the ashes first because not everyone is comfortable possessing someone’s ashes.
  • Bury your ashes. Just because you choose cremation doesn’t mean that you can’t have a service. Many people choose to have a service where friends and family pay their respects and concludes with your remains interred in the cemetery of your choosing.

What happens to your remains is up to you

What you choose to have happen with your remains after your death is a decision that no one else can make for you and one that is uniquely your own. This is also true for what happens to your ashes after cremation. You can have ultimate say in who becomes in charge of your ashes.